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Hesperus Reviews and Discussion

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the wreck of hesperus?

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so they both die? and whats the theme of the story? and whats a breaker "Ho! ho! the breakers roared!" http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Poetry/Wreck.htm

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"The Wreck of the Hesperus" is a poem that presents the tragic consequence of a sea captain's foolish pride. On an ill-fated voyage in the winter, he had his daughter aboard ship for company. The disaster came when the captain ignored the advice of one of his experienced men. A ferocious Nor'easter blew up, bringing snow and bone-chilling wind. The skipper tied his daughter to the mast to prevent her from being swept overboard, then tied himself to the helm. Before long, the captain and all his crew died of cold and exposure. The ship crashed onto the "reef of Norman's woe," and the body of the captain's lovely daughter was later discovered by a fisherman. Longfellow's final plea has a double meaning. It is a call to God to save men from such a horrible death, as well as a call to men to humble their pride and heed the voice of experience:

Can anyone explain the last verse of the poem 'Hesperus' by John Clare?

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I have to write about this for an English lit. essay and I'm not sure about the lines "Hesperus, thy twinkling ray Beams in the blue of heaven And tells the traveller on his way That earth shall be forgiven" I know they relate to Christian ideas about God and the Bible but I'm unsure about which parts exactly? Or they could be about Greek mythology? Help please! I have to write about this for an English lit. essay and I'm not sure about the lines "Hesperus, thy twinkling ray Beams in the blue of heaven And tells the traveller on his way That earth shall be forgiven" I know they relate to Christian ideas about God and the Bible but I'm unsure about which parts exactly? Or they could be about Greek mythology? Help please! Also, does anyone know when it was published? I'm wondering if it was influenced by Longfellow's "The Wreck of the Hesperus"

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Hesperus the day is gone Soft falls the silent dew A tear is now on many a flower And heaven lives in you Hesperus the evening mild Falls round us soft and sweet 'Tis like the breathings of a child When day and evening meet Hesperus the closing flower Sleeps on the dewy ground While dews fall in a silent shower And heaven breathes around Hesperus thy twinkling ray Beams in the blue of heaven And tells the traveller on his way That earth shall be forgiven .... Hesperus is the Evening Star (the planet Venus, seen in the west;- the first star to appear on most nights of the year. John Clare is very careful to avoid suggesting either Christian or Greek mythology here (he might easily have done either, had he so chosen). The poem is a series of images of how the night is quiet and calm (after a busy, bustling day). The central idea here - which you find in many of John Clare's poems - is that it doesn't really matter what bad stuff has gone on during the day (or what good stuff either); night is coming, and everything - good and bad alike - is soon to be forgotten in sleep. You could also read the poem to say that it hardly matters what happens in Life (good or bad); Death comes in the end, and settles all debts. Good, bad, love, hate ... all are temporary. Hesperus - the Evening Star - reminds us of this.

What is the wreck of the Hesperus?

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Thanks for the warning Jan

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This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. Please improve this article if you can. (May 2007) "The Wreck of the Hesperus" is a poem by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, first published in Ballads and Other Poems in 1842.[1] Contents [hide] * 1 Overview * 2 Inspiration * 3 In popular culture * 4 References [edit] Overview Wikisource Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Wreck of the Hesperus "The Wreck of the Hesperus" is a story that presents the tragic consequences of a sea captain's pride. On an ill-fated voyage in the winter, he had his daughter aboard ship for company. The disaster came when the captain ignored the advice of one of his experienced men, who feared that a hurricane was approaching. When the hurricane arrives, he ties his daughter to the mast to prevent her from being swept overboard; she calls out to her dying father as she hears the surf beating on the shore, then prays to Christ to calm the seas. The ship crashes onto the reef of Norman's Woe and sinks; a horrified fisherman finds her body, still tied to the mast, drifting in the surf the next morning. The poem ends with a prayer that we all be spared such a fate "on the reef of Norman's Woe". [edit] Inspiration Longfellow combined fact and fancy to create this, one of his best-known, most macabre, and most enduring poems. His inspiration was the great Blizzard of 1839, which ravaged the northeast coast of the United States for 12 hours starting January 6, 1839, destroying over 1000 ships with a loss of over 40,000 lives.[2] He probably drew specifically on the destruction of the Wiscasset, Maine ship Favorite on the reef of Norman's Woe (located off the coast of Gloucester, Massachusetts); all hands were lost, one of whom was a woman, who reportedly floated to shore dead but still tied to the mast.[3] It is possible that this detail was taken from a different ship that foundered during the same storm, however. [edit] In

Who knows good facts about the greek god Hesperus?

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Hesperus is the God of the Evening Star (Venus). He is NOT considered to be a major god and is typically associated with the Titan Helios (the Titan/God of the Sun) For more information on Hesperos or any other Greek Gods, www.theoi.com is a good source to bookmark

May you name me an adventure poem with a meiosis in it?

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The Wreck of The Hesperus

Origin of Hesperus ?

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In Hesiod, the oldest account, he is Eosphoros, born of Erigeneia. See Theogeny, starting in line 381. Keep in mind however, that .iIn the ancient Greek Games (Olympian, Pythian, Nemean, and Isthmean) poetry was a much a competition as were gymnastics. Poets throughout the BCE period, and later, sought to make a name for themselves by outdoing former poets. As a result of this competitive environment, later Greek mythology became more and more conflated, confused, and corrupted over the centuries. Later accounts, such as those presented in Wiki are very often the final conflated forms of Mythology, and are therefore poor representations of original Greek mytjology.

I want to understand the poem "The wreck of Hesperus"?

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I want to understand the poem "The wreck of Hesperus" by H.W.Longfellow.I found a site where people where commenting the poem I read through it all but could not get the explanation of that poem.Can you tell me what the poem is all about or the theme( or gist) of the poem.I guess it was a very famous poem.thank you so much (in advance).

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Well i read this today for the first time so... The first 4 lines...... It was the schooner Hesperus, That sailed the wintry sea; And the skipper had taken his little daughter, To bear him company. The explanation in my opinion is about the struggle and ego of human to the difficulties of life which sometimes think that can accomplish everything.... "Come hither! come hither! my little daughter, And do not tremble so; For I can weather the roughest gale That ever wind did blow." and how faith to God and Love can make things look less unbearable... This poem describes a shipwreck...one could see the Hesperus (in Greek Εsperos=evening) ship like life... (Sorry for the spelling, I'm Greek :) )

the Wreck of the Hesperus?

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What is the tone/mood and theme in poem the Wreck of the Hesperus? In the poem the Wreck of the Hesperus by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, what is the tone? I have never been good at poetry and I am having a difficult time with this that I just really need help now.

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The tone/mood seems to be quite dark and a little sad.

How to right a poem about the wreck of the Hesperus?

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The Hesperus is on the sea it's decks are all awash! It ran into a big old reef bonk, bonk, splosh!

i have to do a report on the wreck of the hesperus i don't get it?

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my profeser want the authors meaning what the hell i don't even understand the poem plz help

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A few of the "actual stories" regarding the origin of this poem. After the horrific wrecking of the schooner Hesperus on the reef of Norman's Woe, off Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1839, Longfellow was inspired to write one of his best-known poems. One of the bodies washed ashore was, in fact, lashed to a spar. This gave the poet his theme. The real Hesperus was docked when it was hit by such strong winds that it sailed across the street into the third story of a building. Longfellow had read about the 20 odd shipwrecks from this storm but couldn't get the picture of a woman tied to a mast washed up on shore out of his head. This prompted him to write the poem although he changed the victim from a 45 year old woman to a young girl. The actual Hesperus was a 3-mast coastal schooner docked at Boston's Long Wharf at the time of the hurricane. The wreck from which the morbid details were obtained was actually the brig Favorite, wrecked on the Norman's Woe rocks just outside of Gloucester Harbor, Massachusetts. The Favorite was indeed a total loss with all on board, including a female. Apparently, there was a ship named "Herperus." But that's not the one that Longfellow immortalized. His poem is "The Wreck of the Hesperus" (note the "s" in the middle, not the "r"). The Great Blizzards of 1839 inspired the great American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow to write The Wreck of the Hesperus On December 17, 1839 a disastrous storm hit the Atlantic coast, from Boston to Gloucester harbor. Seventeen schooners were wrecked and 40 lives were lost. Unable to sleep after reading the news in the Boston Post, Longfellow sat up one night long after midnight and composed the poem effortlessly. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, based his ballad, "The Wreck of the Hesperus," on the destruction of the Helen Eliza, which crashed off Peaks Island's shore in 1869. John Liptrot Hatton was mostly self-taught as a musician. He enjoyed an enormous popularity during the nineteenth century for his ballads which are often of the highest quality. He also produced two cathedral services, eight anthems, a mass, an operetta and two operas. He was also well known as a performer, mostly of his own songs, which he interpreted in such a way that he invariably had the audience at his feet. A good performance of 'The Wreck of the Hesperus' can still be a very moving experience today, nearly 200 years after it was first heard.

what type of poem is "the wreck of the hesperus"?

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It could be a lyric poem, sonnet, concrete poem, or a ballad. im not sure

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Many real-life poems naturally belong to two or more genres (genres are made up by critics or teachers, poets are not obliged to fit into their boxes). The Wreck of the Hesperus is a ballad inasmuch as it tells a story (especially since it tells the story in précis form), but also a lyric inasmuch as it uses the story to point a Christian message ("Christ save us all from a death like this, /On the reef of Norman's Woe!"). The poem also has elements of threnody, meditation, homily, fable - and possibly even some other forms. If a teacher asks what sort of poem The Wreck of the Hesperus is: the simple and uninformative answer they want is 'A Ballad'. But when somebody with a genuine interest in poetry asks the question: it is better to think in what ways the poem is a ballad, in what ways a lyric, in what ways a homily ........

the wreck of the Hesperas/Hesparis? - have you heard of it?

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before my grandma died..when she was feeling unwell and you asked her how she was...she used to say 'I feel like the Wreck of the Hesperas'. we never did know what this was...have you heard of it? was it a lost ship or something...appreciate any answers - thank you!

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"WRECK OF THE HESPERUS" It was the schooner Hesperus, That sailed the wintery sea; And the skipper had taken his little daughter, To bear him company. Blue were her eyes as the fairy flax, Her cheeks like the dawn of day, And her bosom white as the hawthorn buds, That ope in the month of May. The Skipper he stood beside the helm, His pipe was in his mouth, And he watched how the veering flaw did blow The smoke now West, now South. Then up and spake an old Sailor, Had sailed the Spanish Main, "I pray thee, put into yonder port, for I fear a hurricane. "Last night the moon had a golden ring, And to-night no moon we see!" The skipper, he blew whiff from his pipe, And a scornful laugh laughed he. Colder and louder blew the wind, A gale from the Northeast, The snow fell hissing in the brine, And the billows frothed like yeast. Down came the storm, and smote amain The vessel in its strength; She shuddered and paused, like a frighted steed, Then leaped her cable's length. "Come hither! come hither! my little daughter, And do not tremble so; For I can weather the roughest gale That ever wind did blow." He wrapped her warm in his seaman's coat Against the stinging blast; He cut a rope from a broken spar, And bound her to the mast. "O father! I hear the church bells ring, Oh, say, what may it be?" "Tis a fog-bell on a rock bound coast!" -- And he steered for the open sea. "O father! I hear the sound of guns; Oh, say, what may it be?" Some ship in distress, that cannot live In such an angry sea!" "O father! I see a gleaming light. Oh say, what may it be?" But the father answered never a word, A frozen corpse was he. Lashed to the helm, all stiff and stark, With his face turned to the skies, The lantern gleamed through the gleaming snow On his fixed and glassy eyes. Then the maiden clasped her hands and prayed That saved she might be; And she thought of Christ, who stilled the wave, On the Lake of Galilee. And fast through the midnight dark and drear, Through the whistling sleet and snow, Like a sheeted ghost, the vessel swept Tow'rds the reef of Norman's Woe. And ever the fitful gusts between A sound came from the land; It was the sound of the trampling surf, On the rocks and hard sea-sand. The breakers were right beneath her bows, She drifted a dreary wreck, And a whooping billow swept the crew Like icicles from her deck. She struck where the white and fleecy waves Looked soft as carded wool, But the cruel rocks, they gored her side Like the horns of an angry bull. Her rattling shrouds, all sheathed in ice, With the masts went by the board; Like a vessel of glass, she stove and sank, Ho! ho! the breakers roared! At daybreak, on the bleak sea-beach, A fisherman stood aghast, To see the form of a maiden fair, Lashed close to a drifting mast. The salt sea was frozen on her breast, The salt tears in her eyes; And he saw her hair, like the brown sea-weed, On the billows fall and rise. Such was the wreck of the Hesperus, In the midnight and the snow! Christ save us all from a death like this, On the reef of Norman's Woe! By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. I know the saying, I sometimes use it myself! Kay www.positive-personal-growth.com

Sad poems that can make someone cry?

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I need something to make me cry i dont know why im just in a sad mood and feel like crying so anything? If you dont want to write the whole you can give me a link to it. Thanks!

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The Wreck of the Hesperus - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow It was the schooner Hesperus, That sailed the wintry sea; And the skipper had taken his little daughter, To bear him company. Blue were her eyes as the fairy-flax, Her cheeks like the dawn of day, And her bosom white as the hawthorn buds, That ope in the month of May. The skipper he stood beside the helm, His pipe was in his mouth, And he watched how the veering flaw did blow The smoke now West, now South. Then up and spake an old Sailòr, Had sailed to the Spanish Main, "I pray thee, put into yonder port, For I fear a hurricane." Last night, the moon had a golden ring,And to-night no moon we see!" The skipper, he blew a whiff from his pipe, And a scornful laugh laughed he. Colder and louder blew the wind, A gale from the Northeast, The snow fell hissing in the brine, And the billows frothed like yeast. Down came the storm, and smote amain The vessel in its strength; She shuddered and paused, like a frighted steed, Then leaped her cable's length. "Come hither! come hither! my little daughtèr,And do not tremble so; For I can weather the roughest gale That ever wind did blow." He wrapped her warm in his seaman's coat Against the stinging blast; He cut a rope from a broken spar, And bound her to the mast. "O father! I hear the church-bells ring, Oh say, what may it be?" "'T is a fog-bell on a rock-bound coast!" And he steered for the open sea. "O father! I hear the sound of guns, Oh say, what may it be?" "Some ship in distress, that cannot live In such an angry sea!" "O father! I see a gleaming light, Oh say, what may it be?" But the father answered never a word, A frozen corpse was he. Lashed to the helm, all stiff and stark, With his face turned to the skies, The lantern gleamed through the gleaming snow On his fixed and glassy eyes Then the maiden clasped her hands and prayed That savèd she might be; And she thought of Christ, who stilled the wave On the Lake of Galilee. And fast through the midnight dark and drear, Through the whistling sleet and snow, Like a sheeted ghost, the vessel swept Tow'rds the reef of Norman's Woe. And ever the fitful gusts between A sound came from the land; It was the sound of the trampling surf On the rocks and the hard sea-sand. The breakers were right beneath her bows, She drifted a dreary wreck, And a whooping billow swept the crew Like icicles from her deck. She struck where the white and fleecy waves Looked soft as carded wool, But the cruel rocks, they gored her side Like the horns of an angry bull. Her rattling shrouds, all sheathed in ice, With the masts went by the board; Like a vessel of glass, she stove and sank,Ho! ho! the breakers roared! At daybreak, on the bleak sea-beach, A fisherman stood aghast, To see the form of a maiden fair, Lashed close to a drifting mast. The salt sea was frozen on her breast, The salt tears in her eyes; And he saw her hair, like the brown sea-weed, On the billows fall and rise. Such was the wreck of the Hesperus, In the midnight and the snow! Christ save us all from a death like this, On the reef of Norman's Woe!    

Pre 20th centuary poem?

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I'm participating in the arts festival and I need a pre 20th centuary poem to act out dramatically. can anybody help find me a sad or dramatic one but it shouldnt be too long or too short.

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"WRECK OF THE HESPERUS" It was the schooner Hesperus, That sailed the wintery sea; And the skipper had taken his little daughter, To bear him company. Blue were her eyes as the fairy flax, Her cheeks like the dawn of day, And her bosom white as the hawthorn buds, That ope in the month of May. The Skipper he stood beside the helm, His pipe was in his mouth, And he watched how the veering flaw did blow The smoke now West, now South. Then up and spake an old Sailor, Had sailed the Spanish Main, "I pray thee, put into yonder port, for I fear a hurricane. "Last night the moon had a golden ring, And to-night no moon we see!" The skipper, he blew whiff from his pipe, And a scornful laugh laughed he. Colder and louder blew the wind, A gale from the Northeast, The snow fell hissing in the brine, And the billows frothed like yeast. Down came the storm, and smote amain The vessel in its strength; She shuddered and paused, like a frighted steed, Then leaped her cable's length. "Come hither! come hither! my little daughter, And do not tremble so; For I can weather the roughest gale That ever wind did blow." He wrapped her warm in his seaman's coat Against the stinging blast; He cut a rope from a broken spar, And bound her to the mast. "O father! I hear the church bells ring, Oh, say, what may it be?" "Tis a fog-bell on a rock bound coast!" -- And he steered for the open sea. "O father! I hear the sound of guns; Oh, say, what may it be?" Some ship in distress, that cannot live In such an angry sea!" "O father! I see a gleaming light. Oh say, what may it be?" But the father answered never a word, A frozen corpse was he. Lashed to the helm, all stiff and stark, With his face turned to the skies, The lantern gleamed through the gleaming snow On his fixed and glassy eyes. Then the maiden clasped her hands and prayed That saved she might be; And she thought of Christ, who stilled the wave, On the Lake of Galilee. And fast through the midnight dark and drear, Through the whistling sleet and snow, Like a sheeted ghost, the vessel swept Tow'rds the reef of Norman's Woe. And ever the fitful gusts between A sound came from the land; It was the sound of the trampling surf, On the rocks and hard sea-sand. The breakers were right beneath her bows, She drifted a dreary wreck, And a whooping billow swept the crew Like icicles from her deck. She struck where the white and fleecy waves Looked soft as carded wool, But the cruel rocks, they gored her side Like the horns of an angry bull. Her rattling shrouds, all sheathed in ice, With the masts went by the board; Like a vessel of glass, she stove and sank, Ho! ho! the breakers roared! At daybreak, on the bleak sea-beach, A fisherman stood aghast, To see the form of a maiden fair, Lashed close to a drifting mast. The salt sea was frozen on her breast, The salt tears in her eyes; And he saw her hair, like the brown sea-weed, On the billows fall and rise. Such was the wreck of the Hesperus, In the midnight and the snow! Christ save us all from a death like this, On the reef of Norman's Woe! By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

can you give me a good name/title for our yearbook? i would prefer greek names which defines success or unity?

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Hesperus - the evening star (the marker of the evening of your school years) Phosphor - the morning star (the marker of the dawn of a new era of your life)

Please help me with this rhyme scheme?

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I know the "Wreck of the Hesperus" doesn't have a specific rhyme scheme, but can you tell me what it is through out the whole poem?

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It was the schooner Hesperus, That sailed the wintery sea; And the skipper had taken his little daughter, To bear him company. Blue were her eyes as the fairy flax, Her cheeks like the dawn of day, And her bosom white as the hawthorn buds, That ope in the month of May. The Skipper he stood beside the helm, His pipe was in his mouth, And he watched how the veering flaw did blow The smoke now West, now South. Then up and spake an old Sailor, Had sailed the Spanish Main, "I pray thee, put into yonder port, for I fear a hurricane. Those are the first four stanzas of the long poem. (It's by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.) Not sure what you mean when you say that the poem "doesn't have a specific rhyme scheme." It has a very specific rhyme scheme. In every four-line stanza, lines 1 and 3 don't rhyme, but lines 2 and 4 do. If you read a few stanzas out loud, you'll hear that pattern of rhymes. The traditional way to represent that rhyme scheme is xaxa xbxb xcxc, etc., with "x" standing for the non-rhyming lines. The name for that rhyme scheme is "intermittent rhyme" or "ballad rhyme."

What can I compare and constrast about Paul Revere's Ride & The Wreck of the Hesperus?

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similarities- *both written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow *both tell a story (narrative poem) differences- *hesperus" rhyme scheme is ABCB while "revere" rhyme scheme is either AABB(C) or ABAB(C). *plot of poems are different. *"revere" is part-ficition, part-truth; "hesperus" is fictious.

What kind of Spider is this? From Arizona?

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Can anyone identify this spider? http://i447.photobucket.com/albums/qq194/azguero/2010-07-04_143328.jpg

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Western Black Widow. Latrodectus hesperus. Very variable and very colorful for a Black Widow.

i need the exact words of the emperor's nightingale by Hans Christian Anderson. The poem not the story.?

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if it cannot be found could you recommend a good poem. My time limit is 5 minutes so the poem should be big.

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google "wreck of the hesperus" by longfellow. dd

What's a good vampire name?

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I'm writing a story and I need a boy vampire name that goes good with the name Nicole. :)

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Alistair, Lucius, Lucien, Tristan, Victor, Hesperus, Kraven, Alec, Warrick

I need a good poem that i can get into and act out?

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Im entering a poetry slam and im having trouble picking out a great poem that will touch people and that i can act out and get into all at the same time so any ideas? keep in mind im 17 not 12. humpty dumpty dont sound to interesting

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The Highwayman Alfred Noyes The Wreck of the Hesperus Henry Longfellow Jabberwocky Lewis Carol Parts of Beowulf are quite awesome.

I need a published poem.?

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I need a published poem for an English Forensics competition. I need one that will be good for my personallity. Something on the cheery side, funny, with a bit of sarcasm. I don't really own any poetry books and all my local libraries don't either.. unless I'm not looking in the right places or asking the right people. If it's not long, I'll need a collection of poems so it's not going to be too short and boring. Last year I did "Rumpelstiltskin" - Anne Sexton.. I really like her work, but I don't think I want to do another of hers.. just for originality. Sites, suggestions, books to keep an eye out for? All help is welcome.

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try "Wreck of the Hesperus" by Henry Longfellow. excellent poem, and quite long. dd

Where ,on the net , can I get summary of poems and novels ?

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H.W longlellow poems - Hiawatha ; The Wreck of Hesperus Hindi novels of Munshi Premchand i have tried sparkynotes but couldn't find the one i want .. so please suggest some other poetry sites where summaries are available

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try spark notes Wreck of the Hesperus has a free e book at http://www.bookrags.com/ebooks/13830/

please give me the summary of H.G. Wardsworth's poem The wreck of the Hesperus and Paul Rever's Ride?

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please give me the summary of H.G. Wardsworth's poem The wreck of the Hesperus and Paul Rever's Ride

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Longfellow, in The Wreck of the Hesperus, tells of a wooden ship whose captain sailed with his daughter on board. The signs were for a bad storm on the way which a seasoned sailor told the captain about and begged him to sail into a port to wait it out, but the captain would not do it. As the sea became rough, the captain realized his error. In an effort to save his daughter he lashes her to the mast of the ship so she won't be swept overboard. Unfortunately the storm is a freezing one and all perish. The ship drifts to the rocky coastline where it is smashed and sinks. A fisherman sees the wreckage and worst of all sees the captain's daughter still lashed to the mast floating in the waves with the ice still covering her from the storm. In Paul Revere's Ride, Longfellow tells of how the Americans were warned of the British coming. Back then there were no telephones, television or radio so how would news travel? The nation was at war with the British. Paul Revere looked ahead and made plans. He arranged with his cohort signals that would let him know from a distance if the British were coming by land or sea. The cohort gave the signal - two lights in the church tower - that the British were coming by sea. Paul Revere road through the countryside at full speed that night to warn everyone along the way that the British were coming by sea. His alarm was successful and the people fought the British and ultimately won.

female name for the word "hesperus" or evening star?

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Venus is the equivalent female name for the evening star Hesperus, Roman version Vesper.

can someone tell what kind of figurative language the wreck of the hesperus have?

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also can u tell me what part of the poem is the figurative language came from sorry also what kind of poem it is i keep thinking eleggy and epic poem but thats all i got

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The Wreck of the Hesperus is a narrative poem. Here is part of the poem that used figurative language "And the billows frothed like yeast.". Figurative language is when you describe something by comparing it to something else. Your question prompted me to read this poem, so thanks

I want the summary of H.W.Longfellow's The Wreck Of The Hesperus what do i do?

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i want the summary of this poem as fast as possible what do i do?

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Longfellow, in The Wreck of the Hesperus, tells of a wooden ship whose captain sailed with his daughter on board. The signs were for a bad storm on the way which a seasoned sailor told the captain about and begged him to sail into a port to wait it out, but the captain would not do it. As the sea became rough, the captain realized his error. In an effort to save his daughter he lashes her to the mast of the ship so she won't be swept overboard. Unfortunately the storm is a freezing one and all perish. The ship drifts to the rocky coastline where it is smashed and sinks. A fisherman sees the wreckage and worst of all sees the captain's daughter still lashed to the mast floating in the waves with the ice still covering her from the storm.

Hesperus the greek god?

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just a few things, what was he known for? what were his symbols? other facts?

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he was known as the evening star. son of dawn goddess eros and brother of Eosphorus. mainly just a night god. i heard his number is 6164.

Pre-raphaelite painting- need title and artist's name please?

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I found this gorgeous painting of a man and a woman almost kissing but the website offering it as a screen saver does not mention the artist and the title. I have been browsing galleries like mad... Can anyone recognize it? this is the link to the image: http://www.cassdesign.com/images/panel37.jpg

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It is Hesperus, by Joseph Noel Paton Absolutely beautiful!

I need a simple poem for english essay please help?

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Okay i just need a poem that has a straight forward meaning and is by a published author but not difficult to understand and please help me find one with a rhyme scheme please but please not by robert frost because we are not aloud to use his poetry because we did an essay about him already please help! :)

Best answer:

The Wreck of the Hesperus by Henry Longfellow. It's a short poem about a guy who takes his daughter on a voyage with him in the winter and ignores the warnings of a more experienced worker about an incoming storm that will ultimately destroy his ship and kil his daughter.

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Have you any got anything to say about skiing or snowboarding at Hesperus (e.g. the best trails, tips on getting around the mountain, etc)? Skicow would appreciate your comments.


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